Bob Pfannenschmidt stands nearby a Kinder Morgan pipeline protest at Harbour Quay in Port Alberni, representing what he contends is the majority of Canadians. MIKE YOUDS PHOTO

Pipeline protest in Port Alberni

“A divide has been created in the country that does not need to be created.”

  • Jun. 7, 2018 6:00 a.m.

MIKE YOUDS

Special to the News

A bitter wind blew at Harbour Quay Monday night as speaker after speaker stepped up to rail against the latest development in the Trans Mountain pipeline saga.

An anti-pipeline rally organized as part of protests held across the country drew 45 people to the quay in Port Alberni while a few others in favour of the project stood nearby.

A similar rally in March drew greater participation, but the tone this time was clearly more frustrated and resentful after the federal government’s announcement last week that it plans to purchase the existing pipeline for $4.5 billion.

READ: Hundreds show support at pipeline protests across B.C.

READ: Kinder Morgan protest in Port Alberni draws both sides

“I’m angry,” organizer John Mayba told the protesters. “I’m angry because Justin Trudeau wants to make us his partners in crime. ‘You can have jobs and prosperity. All you need to do is take this pipeline.’ ”

Protesters were encouraged to wear red to convey their rage over the Liberal government’s determination to see the pipeline project completed using public funds. Mayba led them in singing We Shall Overcome, an anthem made famous by the civil rights movement.

“A divide has been created in the country that does not need to be created,” said City of Port Alberni Councillor Chris Alemany, taking the microphone. “We now have a situation where our federal government has invested $4.5 billion upon an old pipeline and committed to spending $7-$10 billion on a new pipeline and a few billion more on oil cleanup.”

The total cost to Canadians is likely to be $20 billion, Alemany said.

“That’s a lot of money that maybe we could invest in transportation solutions … That’s a lot of investment we could be having in our communities to transition from fossil fuels to whatever the future may hold.”

Canadians need to come together to focus instead on making the transition to alternatives that would help assure a better future, he added to applause. The divisiveness is not good for anyone, he said.

“I think this is going to be a long, hot summer and I am frankly a little worried about that,”Alemany said.

Speaking for Courtenay-Alberni NDP MP Gord Johns, who was in Ottawa, Sarah Thomas said climate leaders don’t spend $4.5 billion on pipelines. Johns called it a bad deal but sounded an optimistic note that held out hope Ottawa might listen.

“How can the government say they are fighting climate change when their actions say otherwise,” she said. “We all care about the health of our sensitive ecosystems and the rights of Indigenous peoples who are saying no to this risky project. We all care about protecting marine life, especially our West Coast salmon; we care about our fishing and seafood industries. And we all care about creating clean, sustainable jobs in our communities and ending fossil fuel subsidies.”

Others stepped forward to speak their minds.

“I really do believe the future of British Columbia lies in its environment,” said Michael Millin. “Oil is the way of the past. We have to transition to a real future, not this future.

“I think it’s really important that we stand up for our rights in order to have control of our own environment.”

Bob Pfannenschmidt once again stood by, as he did at the rally in March, quietly holding up the other side of the debate with a sign that read “KM build it.”

“The majority of Canadians support building the Kinder Morgan pipeline,” he said. What has turned the tide is the Liberal government’s move to buy into the project.

“The reason they decided to buy out Kinder Morgan is because these people are protesting. It’s our current government, the premier and his Minister of Environment George Heyman that are causing this issue.”

Pfannenschmidt said over-population is root of the problem and that oil is not going away. Canada is a small country that needs to get the best value for its resources, he argued.

“For sure,” added John Van Dyke. “No province has the right to tell the federal government what to do.”

 

John Mayba speaks to anti-pipeline protesters Monday, June 4 at Harbour Quay in Port Alberni. MIKE YOUDS PHOTO

Just Posted

Tofino’s first Jazz Festival swings into town this weekend

“I wanted a night of music were you didn’t have to go through fences to access the music.”

UPDATE: Construction on Hwy. 4 halted after tree crashes into traffic

Trees are being cleared along the highway between Port Alberni and the Tofino-Ucluelet junction.

GoFundMe page launched for families of three missing Tla-o-qui-aht First Nation fishermen

Men have been missing since their vessel capsized near Tofino on June 15.

115 new wildfires burning across B.C. due to 19,000 lightning strikes

More fires expected to start today, says BC Wildfire Service officials

Marijuana to be legal in Canada Oct. 17: Trudeau

Prime Minister made the announcement during question period in the House of Commons

B.C. BMX kid wows GoPro with homemade video

Eight-year-old Rex Johnson wins award for inventive video

Blue Jays closer Roberto Osuna suspended for 75 games

23-year-old pitcher faces assault charge

Vancouver Canucks tab Quinn Hughes with No. 7 overall pick in NHL draft

University of Michigan standout was second defenceman picked in first round

Gun, drugs and cash seized in arrest of alleged B.C. fentanyl dealer

Vancouver Island man Brent Connors is facing nine charges in relation to investigation

Jogger spent two weeks in U.S. detention centre after accidentally crossing B.C. border

Cedella Roman, 19, crossed the border while out for a run

PHOTOS: Police rescue baby seal found on rocky B.C. shoreline

Marina Mammal Rescue Centre recommends residents observe from a distance

B.C. woman with severely disabled son keeps getting parking tickets

‘There has to be something they could do’

Man brandishes axe during robbery

Mounties were able to locate the suspect within two hours of the incident

‘Creep off’ reporting system aims to track street harassment in Metro Vancouver

Text-based hotline launches to collect public reports on where and when harassment occurs

Most Read