Canadian singer Bryan Adams appears as a witness at a Standing Committee on Canadian Heritage in Ottawa on Tuesday, Sept. 18, 2018. Adams is facing backlash over social media posts on the novel coronavirus that some critics are calling racist. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick

Canadian singer Bryan Adams faces backlash over COVID-19 social media posts

Many on social media condemned Adams’s comments as racist

Canadian singer Bryan Adams is facing backlash over social media posts on the novel coronavirus that some critics are calling racist.

On Twitter and Instagram, Adams blamed the global pandemic on “(expletive) bat eating, wet market animal selling, virus making greedy bastards.”

He said his message to those people is to “go vegan,” which is a diet he’s had for decades.

Adams also decried the impact of the virus on the world, noting the cancellation of a series of shows he was set to play in England.

The tweet appears to have since been deleted while the Instagram post was still up this morning, though it seems comments have been closed.

Many on social media condemned Adams’s comments as racist, saying he was contributing to anti-Chinese rhetoric surrounding the virus.

Others accused the rocker of losing sight of the true victims of a pandemic that has claimed hundreds of thousands of lives worldwide.

“It is not my intention to ‘go at’ or ‘cancel’ anyone, but to identify posts like this that condone and enable acts of hate and racism. It runs counter to everything I love about Canada,” Chinese-Canadian actor Simu Liu wrote on Twitter.

“I hope Bryan does better for the millions who look up to him like I do. #BummerOf69.”

Liu — star of CBC’s ”Kim’s Convenience” and Marvel’s upcoming film “Shang-Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings” — added that he doesn’t think it was Adams’ “intention to promote xenophobia.”

“And I know this virus has made everyone a little testy,” he wrote. “I hope we can use this as an opportunity to channel positivity instead. Let’s support those on the front lines. Let’s HELP.”

Inuit throat singer and author Tanya Tagaq tweeted: “Bryan Adams can suck my bat.”

Adams’ comments come amid Asian and South Asian Heritage Month, which Liu is trying to promote on social media by spotlighting the works of notable Asian Canadians.

The Canadian Press

Coronavirus

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

QUIZ: How much do you know about British Columbia?

On this B.C. Day long weekend, put your knowledge of our province to the test

Ucluelet fire crew extinguishes residential blaze

Ucluelet’s fire chief is praising his crew for making short work of a residential blaze on Tuesday.

DFO reports unusually high whale mortalities in 2020

“It’s so important to have all these eyes and ears in the community reporting these deaths.”

Tofino housing project criticized at public hearing

Town’s council hosts first public hearing since start of COVID-19 pandemic.

VIDEO: Otter pups learn to swim at B.C. wildlife rescue facility

Watch Critter Care’s Nathan Wagstaffe help seven young otters go for their first dip

Alleged impaired driver sparks small wildfire near Lytton after crash: B.C. RCMP

Good Samaritans prevented the blaze from getting out of control

Travel restrictions inspiring co-operation in border communities

Small border towns are asking for exemption to travel ban

B.C. First Nation adopts ‘digital twinning’ software to better manage territory

Software allows users to visualize what a mountain might look like if the trees on its slopes were logged

Woman arrested near Nanaimo beach after alleged road rage incidents

37-year-old woman facing charges including assault, assaulting a police officer, impaired driving

All inquiry recommendations implemented after fatal Port Hardy RCMP shooting: Ministry

The Independent Investigations Office of B.C. cleared the RCMP officers involved of wrongdoing

Leave your deets when dining: Restaurants taking personal info to trace COVID-19

Health officials say indoor dining presents a higher risk

Raptors kneel for both American and Canadian anthems ahead of tipoff

Majority of players have substituted their names on the backs of their jerseys with racial and social justice messages

Most Read