B.C. Green Party leader Andrew Weaver announces he is stepping down as leader next year, B.C. legislature, Oct. 7, 2019. (Tom Fletcher/Black Press)

VIDEO: Andrew Weaver retiring, B.C. Green Party to have new leader next fall

Canada’s first Green MLA will finish his term in 2021

B.C. Green Party leader Andrew Weaver says he will carry on until a new leader is selected next summer, but he will retire from politics after the provincial election in 2021.

Weaver, the first Green elected to a Canadian provincial legislature, is in his second term as MLA for Oak Bay-Gordon Head. He announced Monday as the B.C. legislature resumed sitting that he has asked the B.C. Green Party executive to start the process of selecting a new leader next summer.

Weaver said his decision has nothing to do with a health problem that has had him working from home in recent weeks, and he has no plans to enter the federal scene, where Green Party leader Elizabeth May is hoping to add to her current two-seat caucus.

“The last thing in the world I will ever do, and you can just watch the daily news cycle in the federal election, is run federally,” Weaver said. “I can assure you and swear on a stack of Bibles, that will never, ever happen.”

RELATED: B.C. carbon tax up in 2019, other provinces far behind

RELATED: Greens force speculation tax reduction for Canadians

Weaver listed his accomplishments over the past two years as supporter of the minority NDP government of Premier John Horgan, including eliminating corporate and union donations to political parties in favour of a per-vote taxpayer subsidy for parties, and the government’s “CleanBC” program to reduce greenhouse gases from transportation, housing and other sources over the next two decades.

Horgan said Monday that Weaver’s decision won’t have any effect on his party’s minority government support agreement with the B.C. Greens, which allowed the NDP to assure the Lieutenant Governor that it had a working majority in the legislature.

Weaver said he may return to the University of Victoria, where he taught applied mathematics and climate modelling before entering politics in 2013. Weaver has contributed to reports of the United Nations’ Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, and has often said he was motivated to run for the legislature after former premier Christy Clark froze B.C.’s pioneering carbon tax.


@tomfletcherbc
tfletcher@blackpress.ca

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Just Posted

Ucluelet reconsiders rejected pot shop

Cannabis Open House coming up in November

2019 FEDERAL ELECTION: Courtenay-Alberni candidates address other issues of importance

Other than the topics already discussed, what do you feel is the most important issue in your constituency?

Courtenay-Alberni candidates trade barbs at Alberni all candidates meeting

Crime, climate change, seniors all on slate of questions

B.C.’s rural paramedic program expands, with home support

Advanced care ambulance staff added for six communities

Heiltsuk Nation open first Big House in 120 years in northern B.C.

Opening means the community now has an appropriate space for spiritual and ceremonial events

Singh says NDP would form coalition with the Liberals to stop Tories

Singh was in a Liberal-held riding Sunday afternoon in Surrey where he was pressed about his post-election intentions

‘My heart goes out to the mother’: B.C. dad reacts to stabbing death of Ontario boy

Carson Crimeni, who was also 14, was bullied relentlessly, his dad says

BC Ferries filling up fast with post-Thanksgiving weekend travellers

Monday anticipated to be busiest day of the weekend

The one with the ‘Friends’ photoshoot: Kelowna group recreates TV show intro

A friend’s departure prompted them to create something that really says, “I’ll be there for you”

Canadian Snowbirds plane crashes before air show in Atlanta

Pilot lands safely after ejecting from jet

Share crash data, private insurers tell David Eby, ICBC

B.C. monopoly makes drivers retrieve their own records

B.C. VIEWS: Wolf kill, not backcountry bans, saving caribou

B.C.’s largest herds turn the corner from extinction

Most Read