Oyster Harbour residents are ready for Light Up. From left to right: Ralph Carlson, Janet Gray, Kay Rozzano, Angelina Passarelly, Wilma Ostle, Tracy Mckee, Phillis Timothy, Angie Willett (Cole Schisler photo)

Oyster Harbour residents are ready for Light Up. From left to right: Ralph Carlson, Janet Gray, Kay Rozzano, Angelina Passarelly, Wilma Ostle, Tracy Mckee, Phillis Timothy, Angie Willett (Cole Schisler photo)

Ladymith elders still giddy for town’s annual for Festival of Lights

Vancouver Island’s most-celebrated Light Up event happens tonight in downtown Ladysmith

The lights strung, the decorations are up, and spirits are high as Ladysmith prepares for the 32nd annual Light Up Festival of Lights tonight.

At Oyster Harbour Seniors Community, Light Up is a chance for residents to participate in the community they helped build. Residents will join the Light Up parade in the Oyster Harbour shuttle bus decorated by Roy Mckee and Janet Gray.

Phillis Timothy, Wilma Ostle, Kay Rozzano, and Ralph Carlson have lived in Ladysmith their entire lives. Each of them remembers the first Light Up, 32 years ago.

“We saw it all get started, then eventually they came from all over — bus loads — and they’re still coming,” Timothy said.

Rozzano said there were around 300 – 500 people at the first Light Up. Last year’s Light Up saw over close to 30,000 people according to RCMP estimates.

“They said they have to cut the parade down this year, because there’s too many floats wanting to come in,” Rozzano said.

Collectively, the group estimated about 10 floats were in the first parade. They remember floats from Ladysmith service clubs like the Kinsmen, the Eagles, the Healthcare Auxiliary, the Native Daughters, and Ladysmith Fire Rescue.

This will be Oyster Harbour’s third year in the Light Up parade, and they’re just as excited as they were the first time.

“By the time we got down to the Wigwam I was ready to run up and kiss Santa Claus I was so excited,” Carlson said.

Each of the residents shared their favourite thing about Light Up.

“Oh gosh, that’s pretty hard to say, because it’s all wonderful,” Timothy said. “All the people, and all that. To see all the busloads coming in, it’s pretty exciting.”

“Being on the bus, and waving to the people outside. We were all together, singing on the bus, doing things like that. It’s a happy time,” Ostle said.

“Everybody’s in a happy mood. All the kids wave for Santa. All your worries and troubles go out the window,” Rozzano said.

“I like being in the parade. I’ve been doing it for over 30 years. I used to cook at the Eagles, we ended up with 500-600 spaghetti dinners a night. A lot of dishes I tell yah’,” Carlson said.

The group expressed gratitude for all the people who have come together over the years to make Light Up happen, both in the past, and today. They look forward to taking part in this year’s Light Up parade, and hope to see many smiling faces lining 1st Avenue.

“Getting to be in this parade, to play with purpose, and getting to remember the past, and getting to be part of the now — getting to be a part of the community they created is pretty incredible,” Oyster Harbour recreation coordinator Angelina Passarelly said.

Ladysmith light-up need-to-knows

Ladysmith’s famous Festival of Lights — the Island’s biggest Christmas light-up — happens tonight, Thursday, Nov. 28.

It starts with a community spaghetti dinner at 3 p.m. at the Eagles Hall ($10 adults and kids under eight, $5), there’s a Christmas craft fair at the Aggie Hall at 4 p.m. and street entertainment and food concessions open and onstage entertainment will continue until 6:15 p.m.

Then the place goes crazy as everyone gets into position along First Avenue downtown to welcome Santa Claus, who shows up at 6:30 p.m. to light up downtown. Following that, there’s a light-up parade starting at 6:45 p.m.

After the parade, at Aggie Hall, there’s the light-up at the hall, Bob Stuart Park, and the Chuck Perrin Christmas Tree, along with spectacular fireworks.

First Avenue will be closed to traffic from 3 p.m. until after the light-up. Organizers ask that people please do not bring pets downtown for the light-up.

This is a hugely popular event, so unless you plan to arrive really early, be ready to walk some distance from your car to get to your viewing spot.

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

 

The festive decorations that energized in late November for the Ladysmith Festival of Lights are coming down this weekend. (file photo)

The festive decorations that energized in late November for the Ladysmith Festival of Lights are coming down this weekend. (file photo)

Just Posted

(B.C. Government photo)
POLL QUESTION: Are you in favour of B.C.’s three-week ban on in-restaurant dining?

Dr. Bonnie Henry called the three week stoppage a “circuit breaker”

A 3.0-magnitude earthquake occurred off Ucluelet just after 12:30 a.m. on April 10 and was reportedly felt as far south as Oregon. (Map via United States Geological Survey)
Quake off Ucluelet reportedly felt as far south as Oregon

Magnitude 1.5 earthquake also reported off Vancouver Island’s west coast hours earlier

Theatre manager Sophie L’Homme is ecstatic to share the news that Tofino’s aging Clayoquot Sound Community Theatre is finally getting upgrades. (Nora O’Malley photo)
BC Arts grant funding breathes new life into Tofino’s community theatre

“Once it’s done, it’s going to be a pride of the town.”

Restaurant patrons enjoy the weather on a patio in Vancouver, B.C., Monday, April 5, 2021. The province has suspended indoor dining at restaurants and pubs until at least April 19 in B.C. due to a spike in COVID-19 numbers. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward
B.C. sets new COVID-19 daily record with 1,293 cases Thursday

New order allows workplace closures when infections found

Pickleball is a favourite recreation for older adults on the West Coast. (Westerly file photo)
Pacific Rim Hospice releases older adult survey report

One key theme unearthed during the research process was the need for companionship

B.C. Health Minister Adrian Dix and Premier John Horgan describe vaccine rollout at the legislature, March 29, 2021. (B.C. government)
1,262 more COVID-19 infections in B.C. Friday, 9,574 active cases

Province’s mass vaccination reaches one million people

People walk past the Olympic rings in Whistler, B.C., Friday, May 15, 2020. Whistler which is a travel destination for tourists around the world is seeing the effects of travel bans due to COVID-19. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward
Adults living, working in Whistler, B.C., eligible for COVID-19 vaccine on Monday

The move comes as the province deals with a rush of COVID-19 and variant cases in the community

RCMP crest. (Black Press Media files)
UPDATE: RCMP investigating after child, 6, dies at motel in Duncan, B.C.

The BC Coroners Service is conducting its own investigation into the circumstances around the child’s death

RCMP display some of the fish seized from three suspects who pleaded guilty to violating the Fisheries Act in 2019, in this undated handout photo. THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO - RCMP
3 banned from fishing, holding licences after overfishing violations near Vancouver Island

Mounties seized the group’s 30-foot fishing vessel and all equipment on board at the time

B.C. Premier John Horgan responds to questions during a postelection news conference in Vancouver, on Sunday, October 25, 2020. British Columbia’s opposition Liberals and Greens acknowledge the COVID-19 pandemic has presented huge challenges for Horgan’s government, but they say Monday’s throne speech must outline a coherent plan for the province’s economic, health, social and environmental future. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
Horgan’s NDP to bring in throne speech in B.C., Opposition wants coherent plan

Farnworth said the budget will include details of government investment in communities and infrastructure

FILE - An arena worker removes the net from the ice after the Vancouver Canucks and Calgary Flames NHL hockey game was postponed due to a positive COVID-19 test result, in Vancouver, British Columbia, in this Wednesday, March 31, 2021, file photo. As vaccinations ramp up past a pace of 3 million a day in the U.S, the NHL is in a tougher spot than the other three major North American professional sports leagues because seven of 31 teams are based on Canada. (Darryl Dyck/The Canadian Press via AP, File)
Vancouver Canucks scheduled to practice Sunday, resume games April 16 after COVID outbreak

Canucks outbreak delayed the team’s season by eight games

Two-year-old Ivy McLeod, seen here on April 9, 2021 with four-year-old sister Elena and mom Vanessa, was born with limb differences. The family, including husband/dad Sean McLeod, is looking for a family puppy that also has a limb difference. (Jenna Hauck/ Chilliwack Progress)
B.C. family looking for puppy with limb difference, just like 2-year-old Ivy

Ivy McLeod born as bilateral amputee, now her family wants to find ‘companion’ puppy for her

Most Read