Science

Sid Sidhu said he may need a new telescope if he’s going to be able to see the asteroid named for him. (Bailey Moreton/News Staff)

Humble B.C. amateur astronomer now officially out of this world

Jaskarn Singh ‘Sid’ Sidhu has an asteroid named after him, honouring his volunteer astronomy efforts

Sid Sidhu said he may need a new telescope if he’s going to be able to see the asteroid named for him. (Bailey Moreton/News Staff)
According to FishSounds.net, fish enjoy lively conversations over the coral reefs. (Photo by Kieran Cox)

University of Victoria researcher helps build global inventory of fish grunts, squeals

Research helps better understand how noise impacts marine life

According to FishSounds.net, fish enjoy lively conversations over the coral reefs. (Photo by Kieran Cox)
RCMP underwater recovery team members Cpl. Todd Kaufmann, left, Cpl. Steve Wells and Const. Tim Cucheran worked with ‘Fab’, a Seamor Marine Chinook ROV to recover a bulldozer operator’s body in Nunavut in February. (Photo submitted)

B.C. tech recovers body after bulldozer breaks through Arctic ice and sinks

Seamor Marine remotely operated vehicle used in deepest recovery operation in RCMP history

RCMP underwater recovery team members Cpl. Todd Kaufmann, left, Cpl. Steve Wells and Const. Tim Cucheran worked with ‘Fab’, a Seamor Marine Chinook ROV to recover a bulldozer operator’s body in Nunavut in February. (Photo submitted)
Christoph Deeg, Pacific Salmon Foundation researcher. Photo by Alanna D Photography.

New Pacific Salmon Foundation research sheds new light on open ocean survival

Study examines relationship between environmental conditions, pathogens, and gene expression

Christoph Deeg, Pacific Salmon Foundation researcher. Photo by Alanna D Photography.
This is a scanning electron microscope photo of some of the sediment from deep in the core from Topknot Lake (ca. 16,500 years ago), showing the remains of several species of diatoms, the identification of which indicates whether the water in the lake was fresh or marine at that time. In Topknot Lake there is no sign of marine diatoms, implying that relative sea level never rose to the height of the lake (13 metres above modern sea level). Photo: T. Holmes, NRCAN

Parts of Northern Vancouver Island missed by last Ice Age — researchers

Lake on west side of Island not covered by ice, prompting questions about early human habitation

This is a scanning electron microscope photo of some of the sediment from deep in the core from Topknot Lake (ca. 16,500 years ago), showing the remains of several species of diatoms, the identification of which indicates whether the water in the lake was fresh or marine at that time. In Topknot Lake there is no sign of marine diatoms, implying that relative sea level never rose to the height of the lake (13 metres above modern sea level). Photo: T. Holmes, NRCAN
Diplodocids, a type of long-necked sauropod, are seen in a hypothetical artist’s rendering of what they looked like during their lives. Cary Woodruff, a recent PhD graduate from the University of Toronto, and a team of researchers studied a fossil that may provide evidence of the first known case of a bird-style lung disease in a dinosaur. THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO-University of Western Ontario

Researchers find evidence of first dinosaur with sore throat, flu symptoms

Canadian scientists say long-necked sauropod was feeling crummy from respiratory infection

Diplodocids, a type of long-necked sauropod, are seen in a hypothetical artist’s rendering of what they looked like during their lives. Cary Woodruff, a recent PhD graduate from the University of Toronto, and a team of researchers studied a fossil that may provide evidence of the first known case of a bird-style lung disease in a dinosaur. THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO-University of Western Ontario
A MarineLabs Data Systems sensor buoy recorded a 17.6 metre rogue wave off Ucluelet’s coast in 2020 that the company believes is the most extreme rogue wave ever recorded. (MarineLabs Data Systems)

Massive rogue wave off Ucluelet reignites alternative energy interest

MarineLabs Data Systems says it is the “most extreme rogue wave ever recorded”

A MarineLabs Data Systems sensor buoy recorded a 17.6 metre rogue wave off Ucluelet’s coast in 2020 that the company believes is the most extreme rogue wave ever recorded. (MarineLabs Data Systems)
Senior biologist Allan Jan holds Methuselah, a 4-foot-long, 40-pound Australian lungfish that was brought to the California Academy of Sciences in 1938 from Australia, in its tank in San Francisco, Monday, Jan. 24, 2022. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu)

Meet Methuselah, the oldest living aquarium fish

1.2-metre Australian lungfish was brought to the San Francisco museum in 1938 from Australia.

Senior biologist Allan Jan holds Methuselah, a 4-foot-long, 40-pound Australian lungfish that was brought to the California Academy of Sciences in 1938 from Australia, in its tank in San Francisco, Monday, Jan. 24, 2022. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu)
A rockfish. Courtesy Central Coast Indigenous Resource Alliance.

Researchers uncover and map biological hotspots of B.C.’s Central Coast

Rich groups of rockfish, sponges and corals found, including in fjords and inland channels

A rockfish. Courtesy Central Coast Indigenous Resource Alliance.
Mark Pathy is seen in his office with a model of the SpaceX starship in Montreal on Monday, November 8, 2021. Pathy is slated to embark in February on a 10-day journey on the maiden voyage of Texas-based Axiom Space paying about 50 million dollars US for the privilege. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Paul Chiasson

Private Canadian astronaut gears up for ‘pain’ experiments in space

Mark Pathy has boarded more than his share of vehicles. He rode…

Mark Pathy is seen in his office with a model of the SpaceX starship in Montreal on Monday, November 8, 2021. Pathy is slated to embark in February on a 10-day journey on the maiden voyage of Texas-based Axiom Space paying about 50 million dollars US for the privilege. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Paul Chiasson
SIMRS will be collecting data on marine mammals like the Risso’s Dolphin. (Sydney Dixon photo)

Strawberry Isle Marine Research Society awarded $20K for pelagic marine research

SIMRS received the $20,000 Clayoquot Biosphere Trust Research Award to collect data on outer shore cetacean and bird species near Tofino

SIMRS will be collecting data on marine mammals like the Risso’s Dolphin. (Sydney Dixon photo)
(The Canadian Press photo)

An ocean menace: Study finds ghost gear capturing species at risk and lobster

‘We can actually make more money if we clean up our act’

(The Canadian Press photo)
The Sardinia Radio Telescope, located in Sardinia, Italy. Credit: S. Fatigoni et al (2021)

B.C. scientists capture most-detailed radio image of the Milky Way’s sister galaxy

Scientists first to create a radio image of the Andromeda Galaxy at the microwave frequency of 6.6 GHz

The Sardinia Radio Telescope, located in Sardinia, Italy. Credit: S. Fatigoni et al (2021)
Bill Merilees, a retired B.C. Parks regional information officer, collected mollusk shells from B.C. and Washington state coastlines for 50 years and has donated his 140,000-specimen collection to University of British Columbia’s Beaty Biodiversity Museum. (Chris Bush/News Bulletin)

Vancouver Island man donates 140,000 mollusk specimens to biodiversity museum

UBC’s Beaty museum grateful for Bill Merilees’s historical record of B.C. marine biodiversity

Bill Merilees, a retired B.C. Parks regional information officer, collected mollusk shells from B.C. and Washington state coastlines for 50 years and has donated his 140,000-specimen collection to University of British Columbia’s Beaty Biodiversity Museum. (Chris Bush/News Bulletin)
Bill Merilees, a retired B.C. Parks regional information officer, collected mollusk shells from B.C. and Washington state coastlines for 50 years and has donated his 140,000-specimen collection to University of British Columbia’s Beaty Biodiversity Museum. (Chris Bush/News Bulletin)

VIDEO: B.C. man donates 140,000 mollusk specimens to biodiversity museum

UBC’s Beaty museum grateful for Bill Merilees’s historical record of B.C. marine biodiversity

Bill Merilees, a retired B.C. Parks regional information officer, collected mollusk shells from B.C. and Washington state coastlines for 50 years and has donated his 140,000-specimen collection to University of British Columbia’s Beaty Biodiversity Museum. (Chris Bush/News Bulletin)
The Greenwich peninsula portion of Prince Edward Island National Park is seen on Tuesday, Aug. 29, 2017. A new report says Canada could reach one-third of its greenhouse gas reduction targets by making better use of its vast forests, prairies and wetlands. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Andrew Vaughan

Study outlines ‘natural climate solutions’ to help Canada meet emissions targets

Report lists 24 nature-based ways for Canada to help cut carbon emissions by 78 million tonnes

The Greenwich peninsula portion of Prince Edward Island National Park is seen on Tuesday, Aug. 29, 2017. A new report says Canada could reach one-third of its greenhouse gas reduction targets by making better use of its vast forests, prairies and wetlands. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Andrew Vaughan
SpaceX space junk burning in night’s sky on March 25, 2021. (screenshot of u/ArcMaster video/Reddit)

VIDEO: SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket debris spotted burning in night’s sky

Hundreds took to social media showing videos and photos of Elon Musk’s space project

SpaceX space junk burning in night’s sky on March 25, 2021. (screenshot of u/ArcMaster video/Reddit)
West Coast Nest is calling for video submissions from local youth. (West Coast Nest photo)

West Coast Nest launches youth video contest

Local youth aged 10 to 18 could win the chance to interview a top scientist

West Coast Nest is calling for video submissions from local youth. (West Coast Nest photo)
A Pacific great blue heron preys on a juvenile salmon in Cowichan Bay. A new study out of UBC suggests the birds removed between three and six per cent of the young fish every year from the Salish Sea region. (Photo supplied by Robert Stenseth)

Blue herons identified as a significant predator of B.C.’s juvenile salmon

Surprising UBC findings may actually be beneficial to stability of salmon populations

A Pacific great blue heron preys on a juvenile salmon in Cowichan Bay. A new study out of UBC suggests the birds removed between three and six per cent of the young fish every year from the Salish Sea region. (Photo supplied by Robert Stenseth)
The humanoid sensing robot has a 3D printed finger cap that measures oxygen levels. (Dr. Woo Soo Kim)

Medical care robots being made with 3D origami in B.C. lab

Would you let a robot take your temperature?

The humanoid sensing robot has a 3D printed finger cap that measures oxygen levels. (Dr. Woo Soo Kim)