Disease

This March 2002 file photo shows a deer tick under a microscope in the entomology lab at the University of Rhode Island in South Kingstown, R.I. Lyme disease has settled so deeply into parts of Canada many public health units now just assume if you get bitten by a tick, you should be treated for lyme disease. THE CANADIAN PRESS/AP/Victoria Arocho

Online map tracks B.C.’s high-risk Lyme disease zones

About 1 in 100 ticks carry Lyme disease in B.C.

 

Necrotizing fasciitis, a disease that is difficult and expensive to treat and often fatal, has cropped up in six dogs in Nanaimo, Parksville and Qualicum Beach since October. (Stock photo)

Vancouver Island veterinarian issues alert about flesh-eating disease in dogs

Six cases of necrotizing fasciitis reported on central Island since the fall

 

Avian flu has been detected in the Comox Valley. (Black Press file)

Vancouver Island egg producer taking measures against avian flu

Cat and Crow Farm owners warned of H5N1 in the area

 

The Global Alliance to End Parkinson’s Disease is marking the 2022 World Parkinson’s Day with the launch of a new international symbol of awareness, “The Spark.” (Courtesy the Global Alliance to End Parkinson’s Disease)

‘We need some urgency behind this’: B.C. advocate calls for action on World Parkinson’s Day

New ‘spark’ symbol released to inspire conversation, awareness around growing disease

The Global Alliance to End Parkinson’s Disease is marking the 2022 World Parkinson’s Day with the launch of a new international symbol of awareness, “The Spark.” (Courtesy the Global Alliance to End Parkinson’s Disease)
Using a specialized chamber, UVic microbiology professor Caroline Cameron works with the bacterium that causes syphilis. She’s researching a better diagnostic test and vaccine for the STI. (Courtesy UVic Photo Services)

B.C. researcher working to develop world’s first syphilis vaccine after case spike

More than 1,400 B.C. residents contracted the STI in 2021

Using a specialized chamber, UVic microbiology professor Caroline Cameron works with the bacterium that causes syphilis. She’s researching a better diagnostic test and vaccine for the STI. (Courtesy UVic Photo Services)
Graeme Johnston of Denman Island has been very ill after exposure to bacteria more typically found in tropical waters. Photo supplied

Denman Island man’s infection from rare bacteria raising questions

Graeme Johnston was likely exposed in ocean after suffering leg wound, says wife

Graeme Johnston of Denman Island has been very ill after exposure to bacteria more typically found in tropical waters. Photo supplied
This photograph of a computer screen during a virtual interview on April 9, 2021, shows Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine, right, as he sits with his wife Fran DeWine while she holds a printed copy of the Yellow Springs News issue page from April 28, 1955 that shows DeWine as a then second-grader, while receiving his polio vaccination. Tens of millions of today’s older Americans lived through the polio epidemic, their childhood summers dominated by concern about the virus. Some parents banned their kids from public swimming pools and neighborhood playgrounds and avoided large gatherings. Some of those from the polio era are sharing their memories with today’s youngsters as a lesson of hope for the battle against COVID-19. Soon after polio vaccines became widely available, U.S. cases and death tolls plummeted to hundreds a year, then dozens in the 1960s, and to U.S. eradication in 1979.(AP Photo/Dan Sewell)

Polio: When vaccines and re-emergence were just as daunting

Survivors sharing their memories with today’s younger people as a lesson of hope

This photograph of a computer screen during a virtual interview on April 9, 2021, shows Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine, right, as he sits with his wife Fran DeWine while she holds a printed copy of the Yellow Springs News issue page from April 28, 1955 that shows DeWine as a then second-grader, while receiving his polio vaccination. Tens of millions of today’s older Americans lived through the polio epidemic, their childhood summers dominated by concern about the virus. Some parents banned their kids from public swimming pools and neighborhood playgrounds and avoided large gatherings. Some of those from the polio era are sharing their memories with today’s youngsters as a lesson of hope for the battle against COVID-19. Soon after polio vaccines became widely available, U.S. cases and death tolls plummeted to hundreds a year, then dozens in the 1960s, and to U.S. eradication in 1979.(AP Photo/Dan Sewell)
Young girls are shown in the Polio girls’ ward at Sick Kids Hospital in a 1937 handout photo in Toronto. The mystery illness that paralyzed and killed mostly children across Canada came in waves that built for nearly four decades before a vaccine introduced in 1955 put an end to the suffering. That was too late for 14-year-old Miki Boleen who contracted polio for a second time in 1953, perplexing doctors who believed “the crippler” could not strike the same patient twice. Boleen, now 80, is hoping for a vaccine for COVID-19 as she reflects on the fear that spread with outbreaks of polio. THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO, Sick Kids Hospital *MANDATORY CREDIT*

Survivors who missed out on polio vaccine hope for breakthrough against COVID-19

An estimated 11,000 people in Canada were left paralyzed by polio between 1949 and 1954

Young girls are shown in the Polio girls’ ward at Sick Kids Hospital in a 1937 handout photo in Toronto. The mystery illness that paralyzed and killed mostly children across Canada came in waves that built for nearly four decades before a vaccine introduced in 1955 put an end to the suffering. That was too late for 14-year-old Miki Boleen who contracted polio for a second time in 1953, perplexing doctors who believed “the crippler” could not strike the same patient twice. Boleen, now 80, is hoping for a vaccine for COVID-19 as she reflects on the fear that spread with outbreaks of polio. THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO, Sick Kids Hospital *MANDATORY CREDIT*