Clayoquot Sound

Simon Fraser University graduate student Jessica Edwards, right, and Nuu-chah-nulth research technicians Tristen Seitcher and Dom Charlie hold out a handful of gooseneck barnacles retrieved in Clayoquot Sound. The data from Edwards’ research will be used to help improve the sustainability of the First Nations managed gooseneck fishery. (Melody Charlie Photo)

Gooseneck barnacle study underway in Clayoquot Sound

Project partners DFO, T’aaq-wiihak Fisheries, and Nuu-chah-nulth Tribal Council.

 

Nine-year-old Lee McNamee, in blue t-shirt, holds the line at a peaceful protest camp on Kennedy Lake in the summer of ‘93. Police removed McNamee from the protest that day, but he wasn’t charged as he was too young. (Photo courtesy of Maureen Fraser)

Pipeline protests spur memories of Clayoquot protests for Tofino and Ucluelet locals

“I could see there was something so special to protect.”

 

Shelley Milne stands over a bag of dead seabirds she collected on Chesterman Beach after the Nestucca oil spill of 1989 hit Canadian shores. It was reported that, in the end, 56,000 seabirds died from the spill. (Leigh Hilbert / Submitted Photo)

Tofino businesses unite for Earth Day

Local shops are offering tours, selling microbrews, “surfing for salmon”, and serving up baked treats to defend the coast from Kinder Morgan.

Shelley Milne stands over a bag of dead seabirds she collected on Chesterman Beach after the Nestucca oil spill of 1989 hit Canadian shores. It was reported that, in the end, 56,000 seabirds died from the spill. (Leigh Hilbert / Submitted Photo)