bears

A rare white grizzly is shown in Banff National Park in this undated handout photo. A wildlife photographer is worried about a rare white grizzly in the mountain parks after watching people get too close to it and seeing it run across the highway. The bear, which has been nicknamed Nakoda by locals, was first revealed publicly after it was spotted in Banff National Park in late April. Parks Canada says it’s not an albino, but a natural colour phase variation that makes the three-and-a-half year old bear white. THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO - Jason Bantle
A rare white grizzly is shown in Banff National Park in this undated handout photo. A wildlife photographer is worried about a rare white grizzly in the mountain parks after watching people get too close to it and seeing it run across the highway. The bear, which has been nicknamed Nakoda by locals, was first revealed publicly after it was spotted in Banff National Park in late April. Parks Canada says it’s not an albino, but a natural colour phase variation that makes the three-and-a-half year old bear white. THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO - Jason Bantle
A resident of Campbell River, Joseph Young, came across the remains of small black bears discarded on the side of a logging road. (Submitted photo)
A resident of Campbell River, Joseph Young, came across the remains of small black bears discarded on the side of a logging road. (Submitted photo)
Brad Bednarz holds an injured calf he and his dad Wyatt rescued from a bear attack north of Williams Lake. (Gail Bednarz photo)

Williams Lake father, son rescue calf from bear attack by throwing rocks, tools

Wyatt Bednarz said at first they thought it was a bear and cub, until they got closer

Brad Bednarz holds an injured calf he and his dad Wyatt rescued from a bear attack north of Williams Lake. (Gail Bednarz photo)
The cream-coloured bear can be seen running off into the forest in the left portion of the photo. (Alexandra Buhr photo)

Spirit bear possibly spotted in West Kootenay

A local resident spotted the white-coloured bear while on an evening trail run near Castlegar on May 27

The cream-coloured bear can be seen running off into the forest in the left portion of the photo. (Alexandra Buhr photo)
Orphaned cub Casey rejoined siblings Dylan and Sumac in the care of the Northern Lights Wildlife Society following his recent rescue in the Shuswap. (Contributed)

Orphaned B.C. bear cub named after Snowbirds Capt. Jenn Casey

Neighbours assist in capture of Tappen Triplets now in care of Northern Lights Wildlife Society

Orphaned cub Casey rejoined siblings Dylan and Sumac in the care of the Northern Lights Wildlife Society following his recent rescue in the Shuswap. (Contributed)
A car was trashed by a black bear in West Trail on Monday. (Trail RCMP photo)

VIDEO: Police give B.C. bear bandit the boot

The RCMP report that garbage was locked in the trunk of the car

A car was trashed by a black bear in West Trail on Monday. (Trail RCMP photo)
Bear shot, later burned in Shuswap gravel pit, sparking B.C. Conservation officers probe

Bear shot, later burned in Shuswap gravel pit, sparking B.C. Conservation officers probe

A black bear killed and dumped in a Tappen gravel pit in mid-April, says BC COS.

Bear shot, later burned in Shuswap gravel pit, sparking B.C. Conservation officers probe
The latest cub at the North Island Wildlife Recovery Centre, Crumpet, is fed milk via syringe. (NIWRA photo)

Crumpet the orphaned bear cub recovering at Vancouver Island wildlife centre

Baby bruin found weak and underweight in Qualicum Beach

The latest cub at the North Island Wildlife Recovery Centre, Crumpet, is fed milk via syringe. (NIWRA photo)
Grinder and Coola, two bears rescued from northern B.C. in 2001, awoke from their 19th hibernation at Grouse Mountain in North Vancouver, B.C., on Tuesday, April 21, 2020. (Grouse Mountain photo)

Rise and shine: Grizzly bear pals emerge from 19th hibernation at Grouse Mountain

Grinder and Coola usually awake to a crowd, but the ongoing pandemic forced a more serene welcoming

Grinder and Coola, two bears rescued from northern B.C. in 2001, awoke from their 19th hibernation at Grouse Mountain in North Vancouver, B.C., on Tuesday, April 21, 2020. (Grouse Mountain photo)
Impacted garbage, recycling service in B.C. prompts call for vigilance at start of bear season
Impacted garbage, recycling service in B.C. prompts call for vigilance at start of bear season
This yearling, now re-located up north, was spotted up a tree in Trail two weeks ago. This was one of many sightings called into BC Conservation the last week of January. (Submitted photo)

B.C. cub that woke early from hibernation taken to sanctuary

Yearling was taken to Northern Lights Wildlife Society in northern B.C.

This yearling, now re-located up north, was spotted up a tree in Trail two weeks ago. This was one of many sightings called into BC Conservation the last week of January. (Submitted photo)
B.C. firefighters rescue bear cub stuck up a tree

B.C. firefighters rescue bear cub stuck up a tree

Family Day was eventful for cub, firefighters

B.C. firefighters rescue bear cub stuck up a tree
Bears coming into communities attracted to improperly stored garbage or fruit remain the biggest source of wildlife conflicts in B.C. (B.C. Conservation Officer Service)

Bear conflicts keep B.C. Conservation Officers busy

Wildlife viewing business faces six charges for baiting bears

Bears coming into communities attracted to improperly stored garbage or fruit remain the biggest source of wildlife conflicts in B.C. (B.C. Conservation Officer Service)
A Kodiak bear is fed ice cream in a Dairy Queen drive-thru in a screengrab from a video posted to Facebook by the Discovery Wildlife Park.                                Photo from THE CANADIAN PRESS

Ice-cream-eating bear draws controversy

An Alberta Wildlife Park posted a video this week of one of their bears going through a Dairy Queen drive-through

A Kodiak bear is fed ice cream in a Dairy Queen drive-thru in a screengrab from a video posted to Facebook by the Discovery Wildlife Park.                                Photo from THE CANADIAN PRESS
West Coast locals and visitors must start focusing on securing all wildlife attractants, like garbage, to keep the local bear population safe from habituation.

Unsecured attractants could bring fines in Ucluelet after trap set for bear

“We do have tickets available and we do and will use them.”

West Coast locals and visitors must start focusing on securing all wildlife attractants, like garbage, to keep the local bear population safe from habituation.