Nanaimo Daily News editorial: Environmental hypocrisy becomes an issue

 

Environmental hypocrisy is beginning to rear its ugly head.

You know the old saying: Be careful when you point a finger at someone, because there will be three pointing back at you. Well, here are some.

The Tofino-Long Beach Chamber of Commerce recently made headlines with their opposition to the Northern Gateway pipeline, raising fears of oil from any possible tanker spills reaching the shores of west coast Vancouver Island and affecting their tourism industry.

We suggest that the Tofino Chamber take a stab at cleaning up its own back yard and solve the problems created by the town pumping its raw sewage into the Pacific Ocean at its own doorstep. Lest we forget, Victoria should do the same. It is mind boggling that arguably Vancouver Island’s top destinations are continuing to flush fresh poo out into the ocean next to the beaches they advertise to tourists. Then there’s Neil Young and his anti-pipeline chorus, complete with five diesel-powered buses running throughout the old balladeer’s concerts.

David Suzuki. Al Gore. The list of high priced pro-environment advocates goes on, flitting to and fro in high priced jets and automobiles. What do those modes of transportation use as fuel? Fossil fuels. What else? Of course we want clean air and water. Thankfully, we have, and will have that in abundance in Canada. But isn’t it time that the hyper-environmentalists stop preaching to the choir and take their message abroad, to those who are really making a negative impact on the environment? China’s continued industrial expansion and growing economy has been well documented, along with its rising levels of pollution. If the eco-friendly people in Canada really want to make a difference, then use some of the funding they’re receiving from American supporters and take road trips to Asia. Show them what they’re doing wrong in regards to the environment, and how to make positive changes to improve their air quality and the health of their citizens.

Others are starting to finger the eco-groups for over sensationalizing issues to make a point, and jeopardizing the economy.

In an article titled ‘Canada’s future prosperity at risk from environmental ‘zealots,’ columnist Gwyn Morgan tackled the sensitive issue.

Morgan wrote that National Resources Canada data shows that in 2011, the resource sector generated 1.6 million jobs and $233 billion in export revenues. That could grow to where it adds a staggering $1.4 trillion to Canada’s GDP and create an average of 600,000 jobs per year.

"These new projects are crucial to preserving that prosperity, anchoring the careers of many young Canadians while providing the financial underpinning for our generous social programs," Morgan states. He adds that "environmental zealots oppose virtually every mine, pipeline or hydroelectric project.. .The proposed Northern Gateway oil pipeline is a prime example. Opponents would have us believe that environmentwrecking oil spills are inevitable. Yet every day in Canada, some three million barrels of oil are safely transported through oil pipelines."

Rich eco-zealot groups have vowed to fight these projects through the courts, and they’re flooding us with misinformation. It’s about time people recognize who and what is behind the antiresource development lobby and call it for what it is: Hypocrisy.

We want to hear from you.

Send comments on this editorial to letters@nanaimodailynews.com.

© Nanaimo Daily News

 

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