May memories warm

Even in death, Lorraine Ennis was a rare and shining example of how to live. Lorraine Ennis became part of my extended family when she sort of adopted my niece and nephew, becoming their Auntie Lorraine – as I know she was for so many other young people.

Although my sister was far from her own family while she was raising her kids, I always knew they were fine at Christmas and Thanksgiving and other occasions because they would be sharing them with Auntie Lorraine.

A lot of questions remain this week. How could one of the world’s sharpest, most vibrant 78-yearolds could be absolutely, joyfully, safely present one moment while on her familiar 8-kilometre walk, and wiped out by a boat trailer the next? Struck down while walking, for her health, on a walking path away from traffic, while wearing a bright yellow reflective jacket so cars could see her – this is, as Sgt. Jeff Swann said, “unfathomable.”

But what I do know is that Lorraine Ennia, while she was here with us, was “fully alive” -I think that’s how her pastor, Miles White, put it. A woman of strong and simple Christian faith, she was devoted to family, to neighbours and friends.

She thought of others always, in simple and gracious ways, whether it was baking cookies for Young Life or graciously adorning the family row at a Terrace wedding, where I snapped a picture of her a few years back.

I look at that picture, a rose pinned to her dress, her warm eyes brimming with pride and joy, and I think even her picture has something to teach about agelessness.

When I pass that place by the road, I’m not going to focus on memories of the shock and tears I felt when I discovered the accident I stopped to cover had claimed the life of someone so locally beloved.

I’m going to focus on good memories, like one of her lovely dinners that coincided with my August birthday, or the memory of her watching her grandkids play with grandmaternal pride. Those are the kind of memories that warm and bring some measure of comfort.

I’m going to think about what she was doing the moments BEFORE she died: she was role modeling for me and for anyone who knew if they were late for work or not by how far along the trail she was.

She showed that even when faced with heartfelt loss, you can learn to smile again and savour the moment – and while you have breath, you can keep walking.

And so we will, too. Thanks, Lorraine. We miss you already. editor@westerlynews.ca

Just Posted

Ucluelet shakes up emergency services, removes manager, eyes new sirens

District has eliminated Emergency and Environmental Manager position

Is Steve Nash Vancouver Island’s best athlete of all-time?

As Captain Canada gets ready to enter basketball’s Hall of Fame it’s time to debate his legacy

Who is Vancouver Island’s greatest athlete ever?

We want to know, you get to choose in a 64-athlete tournament bracket

Tofino mayor says private market won’t solve housing woes

To completely close the affordability gap, Tofino must invest directly in affordable rental housing.

VIDEO: After the floods, comes the cleanup as Grand Forks rebuilds

Business owners in downtown wonder how long it will take for things to go back to normal

Woman’s death near Tofino prompts warning about ‘unpredictable’ ocean

Ann Wittenberg was visiting Tofino for her daughter Victoria Emon’s wedding

B.C. man facing deportation says terror accusation left him traumatized

Othman Hamdan was acquitted of terrorism-related charges by a B.C. Supreme Court judge in September

Will Taylor Swift’s high concert ticket prices stop scalpers?

Move by artist comes as B.C. looks to how to regulate scalpers and bots reselling concert tickets

36 fires sparked May long weekend, most due to lightning: BC Wildfire

As warmer weather nears, chief fire officer Kevin Skrepnek says too soon to forecast summer

Ariana Grande sends message of hope on anniversary of Manchester bombing

Prince William joins survivors and emergency workers for remembrance service

B.C. flood risk switches from snowmelt to rainfall: River Forecast Centre

Kootenays and Fraser River remain serious concerns

Pipeline more important than premiers meeting: Notley

“Canada has to work for all Canadians, that’s why we’re fighting for the pipeline”

Canadian government spending tens of millions on Facebook ads

From January 2016 to March 2018, feds spent more than $24.4 million on Facebook and Instagram ads

Most Read