The B.C. Conservation Officer Service is urging Ucluelet residents to make wolves feel unwelcome in town. (Cheryl Alexander - photo)

Wolf killed in Ucluelet

“This wolf was habituated by people.”

A wolf was killed in Ucluelet on Friday afternoon.

The B.C. Conservation Officer Service destroyed the animal around 12:30 p.m.

Conservation Officer Steve Ackles told the Westerly News the COS had been monitoring the animal for several days.

He said the wolf is believed to have attacked two dogs at a local campground Thursday night and was spotted around Ucluelet Elementary School Friday afternoon around 11:30 a.m.

“This particular wolf was just too, too, calm and content to be around people at close proximity and living inside the town,” he said. “In broad daylight, that’s just not typical wild wolf behaviour to be that comfortable around people.”

The wolf’s behaviour had caused the District of Ucluelet to issue a Wolf Advisory on Thursday following a recommendation from the Conservation Officer Service.

Despite the wolf being killed, Ackles said he’d like to keep the Advisory in place so that local awareness stays high.

“This wolf was habituated by people,” he said. “There are other wolves that have been passing through town…These other wolves haven’t been approaching people and they haven’t been approaching dogs so, if we can instill that they’re not welcome around people, we might have a chance to save these wolves and they’re behaviour won’t escalate.”

This is the second time a habituated wolf has been killed on the West Coast this year, with the first being destroyed in the Pacific Rim National Park Reserve on May 28 after reportedly attacking at least one leashed dog.

Ackles suggested both destroyed wolves had been reported approaching parked cars.

“I’ve seen that before. That’s where people have fed wildlife to get those photos,” he said. “This is learned behaviour and unfortunately it ended that wolf’s life.”

He noted two town hall meetings were held earlier this week where Conservation Officers joined Pacific Rim National park Reserve staff to help locals understand what they need to do to safely coexist with wildlife and he was pleased to see solid engagement at both. He hopes the information delivered at those meetings help locals become solid “ambassadors” so that they can lead by example in terms of coexisting with wildlife.

“We know that wolves are living on the peninsula. It’s a place of wolves, bears and cougars,” he said. “We live with them.”

Anyone who spots a wolf, or other predator, is asked to immediately report their sighting to 1-877-952-7277.

Ackles said early reporting helps Conservation Officers intervene before an animal’s behaviour escalates.

“That gives us a chance to save that bear, or wolf or cougar, before it becomes habituated,” he said. “We have a chance to educate people and get at the root of the problem.”

He encourages locals to leash their pets.

“I’ve got dogs. I love dogs…Don’t let them run off-leash all over the place,” he said. “Wolves see dogs as food. If you love your dog, keep it on a leash unless it’s in a contained area.”

uclueletwolves

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Comments are closed

Just Posted

Ucluelet receives $1M for multi-use space at Amphitrite Point

“I’m glad that we can now go public on it and I look forward to the community dialogue.”

West Coast builder earns four VIBE awards

Icon Developments owner Jamie Carson says collaboration is key.

Ucluelet dedicates off-leash dog park

“I think it’s great. Dogs need a space to run.”

Ucluelet artists launch pop-up art exhibition

Heyduck & Butler opened on July 1 and will run until August 31.

B.C. records 31 new cases, six deaths over three days due to COVID-19

There are 166 active cases in B.C., 16 people in hospital

96-year-old woman scales B.C. butte with help of family, friends

‘I did as I was told and I enjoyed every minute of it’

Parallel crises: How COVID-19 exacerbated B.C.’s drug overdose emergency

Part 1: Officials say isolation, toxic drug supply, CERB, contributing to crisis

Canadians with disabilities disproportionately hit by COVID-19 pandemic

More than four out of 10 British Columbians aged 70 and up have various disabilities

Camping offers a great pandemic escape, for less money than you might think

But for many first-timers, knowing what to bring can be a challenge

Turbulence in Canadian opinion on airlines COVID-19 response: poll

Thousands of people have beseeched Transport Minister Marc Garneau to compel airlines to issue refunds,

Police issue warning after baby comes across suspected drugs in Kamloops park

The 11-month-old girl’s mother posted photos on social media showing a small plastic bag containing a purple substance

Most Read