New rail safety measures are being implemented in Canada in an effort to stop derailments as seen here when a Canadian National Railway train carrying petroleum coke spilled into a creek after a 27 cars of a freight train derailed northeast of Prince George Thursday, March 4, 2020. (Jennifer Goold/Facebook)

New rail safety measures implemented in Canada

Minister of Transport announced three ministerial orders effective April 3

Railway companies carrying large quantities of crude oil or liquefied petroleum gas will be forced to maintain lower speeds in metropolitan areas under new safety measures now implemented in Canada in an effort to reduce train derailments.

Federal Minister of Transportation Marc Garneau announced the measures Friday through three different ministerial orders.

“Rail safety remains my top priority, and the Government of Canada is continuously looking for ways to make our railway system even safer for Canadians,” Garneau said in a news statement.

“I recognize that railway operations in Canada are carried out in a highly complex and difficult environment, but I believe that a strong response is warranted after the series of derailments of trains carrying crude oil.”

READ MORE: Little potash spilled after derailment by lake

There are new speed restrictions for key trains and higher-risk key trains.

Key trains have one or more loaded tank cars of dangerous goods that are toxic by inhalation or contain 20 or more tank cars containing dangerous goods.

Higher-risk key trains carry crude oil or liquefied petroleum gases in a continuous block of 20 or more tank cars or 35 or more tank cars dispersed throughout the train.

Following measures first put in place on Feb. 16, 2020, in response to the derailments of trains carrying crude oil that occurred earlier this winter, higher risk key trains with further mandatory speed reductions everywhere during the winter months from Nov. 15 to March 15.

Speed limit restrictions are also being put in place, such as higher-risk trains having to reduce speed to 30 kilometres an hour between March 16 to Nov. 14 in metropolitan areas, 50 kilometre an hour where there are track signals.

In addition to the speed restrictions, this order also directs companies to address the management of their track maintenance and inspection.

The second and third ministerial orders were issued to direct railway companies to update the current industry rules governing track safety, and the movement of dangerous goods in Canada.

These orders will ensure these measures to reduce train speeds and improve maintenance and inspection practices become a permanent part of safer railway operations in Canada.

READ MORE: CN suspending service between Williams Lake to Squamish

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

railway

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Accident, downed power lines closes Highway 4 west of Port Alberni

Detour is available near Hector Road as BC Hydro crews work to restore power

Chris Lowther becomes Tofino’s second Poet Laureate

“It’s very encouraging and it’s motivating and that’s the greatest gift any writer can receive.”

A second wave of COVID-19 is probable, if history tells us anything

B.C.’s top doctor says that what health officials have learned this round will guide response in future

Stroll through Ucluelet’s history with the free ‘On This Spot’ app

Educational exercise is split into two unique tours and delivered with stunning ‘now and then’ photos

District of Tofino slashes spending and taxation due to COVID-19

Expected tax increase transformed into 19 per cent decrease.

Trudeau to seek 10 days of paid sick leave for Canadian workers, says talks are ongoing

Paid sick leave is key to keeping COVID-19 spread under control, prime minister says

Commercial rent relief applications open as feds encourage landlords to apply

Program would see government cover 50 per cent of the rent

COVID-19: B.C. park reservations surge as campgrounds reopen

Keep trying, many sites not reservable, George Heyman says

B.C. residents can now reserve a provincial campsite for a stay starting June 1

Campsite reservations will only be available to British Columbians

Cullen commission into money laundering in British Columbia resumes today

Inquiry was called amid growing concern that illegal cash was helping fuel real estate, luxury car and gambling

Bike shops busier than ever, but owners worry about stock supply issues

Uptick in cyclists brings new challenges for shops

RCMP facing ‘systemic sustainability challenges’ due to provincial policing role

Provinces, territories and municipalities pay anywhere from 70 to 90 per cent of the cost of the RCMP’s services

One man dead after standoff with Chilliwack RCMP

The Independent Investigations Office of B.C. is investigating the RCMP’s role in the death

B.C. employers worry about safety, cash flow, second wave in COVID-19 restart

A survey found 75 per cent of businesses worry about attracting customers

Most Read