Halfmoon Bay in the Pacific Rim National Park Reserve and Ucluelet First Nation’s traditional territory. (Parks Canada photo)

Halfmoon Bay in the Pacific Rim National Park Reserve and Ucluelet First Nation’s traditional territory. (Parks Canada photo)

Injured hiker rescued, wheeled out on stretcher in the Pacific Rim National Park Reserve

“The visitors were well prepared for their trip”

On Monday evening, July 12, Parks Canada’s Visitor Safety Team responded to a report of an injured visitor at Halfmoon Bay in the Pacific Rim National Park Reserve.

Halfmoon Bay is a small beach located at the bottom of steep, cliff-hugging wooden steps. The callout swiftly turned into a multi-agency rescue, as Parks Canada staff on the ground teamed up with Westcoast Inland Search and Rescue (WISAR), Ucluelet Volunteer Fire Department and BC Ambulance to provide medical care and evacuate the individual.

“The hiker sustained a lower leg injury on a rocky area of the beach and was treated and evacuated on a wheeled stretcher,” read a statement from Parks Canada. “The visitors were well prepared for their trip. The group had planned for their day trip, brought suitable equipment, and were able to call for assistance.”

Parks staff led the stretcher carry with help provided by the WISAR team. The Ucluelet Volunteer Fire Department met the stretcher team at the end of the boardwalk to provide a quick trip up the remaining portion of the trail to the ambulance with their UTV.

“Safety is everyone’s responsibility. At Parks Canada, we do our part to help visitors have a safe and enjoyable experience by managing hazards and providing safety information. Designated trails are actively maintained and often have infrastructure in place to inform visitors and reduce the risk of injury,” notes the Parks Canada statement.

They went on to note that hikers can do their part by being prepared and remaining vigilant of risks.

“This includes leaving a trip plan, choosing appropriate clothing and footwear, and bringing essential items such as food, water, and a communication device.

Parks Canada would also like to remind visitors that rocky coastal shorelines are often slippery and treacherous even during warm, sunny weather, and that extra care should be taken in these areas,” Parks Canada notes.

Hikers are encouraged to visit CoastSmart.ca and AdventureSmart.ca to learn how to prepare for the unexpected before they head out on the trail.



nora.omalley@westerlynews.ca

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

READ: Off-leash dog harasses baby seal at Pacific Rim National Park Reserve

READ: Indigenous owned Ebike rental opens at the Tofino-Ucluelet Junction

HikingParks Canada