IKEA recalls chests, dressers over tip-over hazard

Six children in the U.S. have died since 1989; customers can get refund or wall anchor kit

Millions of dressers

IKEA Canada is recalling millions of chests and dressers because of a tip-over hazard that has resulted in 78 incidents resulting in dozens of injuries including the deaths of six children in the U.S.

Officials are urging consumers to “immediately stop using and move any unanchored IKEA chest of drawers into storage” until they can be secured to a wall or returned to a store.

There have been no fatalities in Canada, but Health Canada said it received one report of a tip-over incident with minor injuries. IKEA Canada received three reports of tip-overs with two minor injuries.

An estimated 6.6 million MALM-style chests and dressers sold in Canada are a part of the recall, the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission announced Tuesday. Dozens of other styles of IKEA three-, four- and five-drawer chests and dressers are also part of the recall.

The recalls include children’s chests and dressers taller than 23.5 inches, and adult chests and dressers taller than 29.5 inches.

Owners can return the MALM or other styles of dressers for a refund, or receive a free kit to fasten the furniture to the wall.

A 22-month-old Minnesota boy died in February when a MALM six-drawer chest fell on top of him.

There were two other deaths in 2014, including a 23-month-old boy from Washington State who became trapped beneath a three-drawer MALM chest that tipped over.

IKEA received reports of 41 tip-over incidents in the U.S. involving MALM chests and dressers — which sold from 2002 to June 2016 for between $70 and $200 — injuring 17 children between 19 months and 10 years old, according to the safety commission.

There were another 41 tip-over incidents in the U.S. involving chests and dressers other than MALMs, which killed three children and injured 19 others.

IKEA Canada said it will now only sell chests of drawers that meet the American Society for Testing and Material standard on free-standing stability.

To receive a free wall-anchoring kit, call 1-800-661-9807 or visit ikea.ca/saferhomestogether.

 

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