Feds dropped ball with WWI anniversary tributes: historians

Wrote one historian: ‘Other than the Vimy Ridge celebration … I think they have done a very bad job’

Canada has missed a chance to mark the 100th anniversary of the First World War with efforts that fell far short of those in allied countries, several historians say.

“I think the government of Canada botched the commemoration of the First World War,” said author and military historian Jack Granatstein, a former head of the Canadian War Museum. “Other than the Vimy Ridge celebration in 2017, I think they have done a very bad job.”

This past Remembrance Day marked not only the centenary of the armistice that ended the First World War, but also the conclusion of four years of commemorations around the world to learn about and remember the “War to End All Wars.”

While the war cost the lives of more than 60,000 Canadians, it also had significant and lasting impacts on Canada’s political, social, economic and cultural landscape, such as the rise of Quebec nationalism, women’s suffrage and more autonomy from Britain.

Veterans Affairs Canada says it has spent $13 million since 2014 on different events commemorating the war, with most of the money dedicated to last year’s high-profile ceremony for the 100th anniversary of the battle of Vimy Ridge. That was a large event: More than 24,000 people attended.

But the British government set the standard when it budgeted 100 million pounds, or about $170 million, for ceremonies, BBC documentaries, school visits to battlefields, museum refurbishments and other programs about the war.

Several other countries also organized signature events and educational programming, with New Zealand setting aside at least $20 million and Australia budgeting nearly $80 million.

READ MORE: Canadians mark Remembrance Day, 100 years since end of First World War

“We had this one event at Vimy,” said Mark Humphries, an expert on the First World War at Wilfrid Laurier University. “Australia has focused so much on both Gallipoli as well as what happened to them on the Western front. Lots of documentaries, miniseries and other stuff focused on it. And in many ways Canada’s kind of been on the sidelines for a lot of this.”

Veterans Affairs contends that it wasn’t sitting on its thumbs over the past four years. Ten large-scale public events were held in Canada and overseas, a spokesman said, while TV and internet advertising reached millions of Canadians.

More than four million books, pamphlets and other pieces of learning material were also distributed each year to schools, youth organizations and community groups.

Still, a glance at the Veterans Affairs website in recent weeks showed that the vast majority of events leading up to the 100th anniversary of the end of the war were organized not by the department but by individual communities and organizations.

One of the most active communities was the small town of Cobourg, Ont., about an hour east of Toronto, where a play about a trial involving Canada’s top general from the war served as the foundation for weeks of larger commemorations.

The government announced last week that Cobourg would get $10,000 from a fund established to support commemorative projects in local communities. Veterans Affairs did not say how much money had been distributed through the fund.

Historians are divided over why the government took the approach it did.

The Conservatives under Stephen Harper launched the First World War commemorations to great fanfare in 2014 after making a big deal of the 200th anniversary of the War of 1812, and were the ones who promised the Vimy Foundation money for the new visitor centre. But some say the Conservatives didn’t start the planning needed years before the commemorations, to begin work on documentaries and other large projects.

Others wonder whether the messy story of Canada’s experience in the First World War, when conscription for a war in Europe threatened to tear the country apart and left lasting divisions, particularly in Quebec, made the government leery about making too much noise about the conflict.

Lee Berthiaume, The Canadian Press

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Ucluelet’s Terrace Beach Resort is for sale

The commercial offering of 21 suites and cabins was recently listed for $4,495,000

Young tourist caught untying boats from Ucluelet dock

“He was just untying the boats and watching them float away,” said Harbour Master Kevin Cortes.

Feds announce $8.3M to deal with ‘ghost’ fishing gear in B.C. waters

Ghost gear accounts for up to 70 per cent of all macro-plastics in the ocean by weight

Ucluelet RCMP warns of scammers impersonating police

“Police will never demand payment of any kind to get rid of an arrest warrant.”

B.C. identifies 20 new COVID-19 cases, travellers specified in count

Pandemic total 3,028 cases, 51 people from outside Canada

Filing deadline in RCMP sexual-harassment class-action extended due to COVID-19

Plaintiffs now have until January 2021 to submit claims for up to $222,000

Jamie Bacon pleads guilty to charge in Surrey Six case

The plea brings an end to a complex legal case that has spanned more than a decade

Hefty undeclared driver charges piling up, ICBC warns customers

Average extra penalty $2,971 after an at-fault accident

Survey, hotline launched amid probe into racist blood-alcohol guessing game at B.C. hospital

Mary Ellen Turpel-Lafond has been appointed to lead an investigation by Health Minister Adrian Dix

RCMP disarm man experiencing mental health crisis

The male pulled a knife on officers and then held it to his own throat expressing a desire to die

B.C. appeals judge’s decision to leave three clubhouses in Hells Angels hands

The province has filed two notices of appeal related to the B.C. Supreme Court decision

Conservation officers relocate Spirit bear known to roam northwestern B.C.

Bear roamed valley north of Terrace for many years

B.C. premier applauds call to decriminalize drug possession

Police shouldn’t struggle with health issues, Horgan says

Most Read