UPDATED: Boil water advisory ends in Tofino

Town’s chlorination system reportedly failed overnight.

A boil water advisory that was originally expected to end on Thursday wound up spilling into Friday before being lifted by Tofino’s district office.

“The District of Tofino has lifted the Boil Water Advisory for all users of the Tofino water system, effective immediately,” read a statement posted to Tofino’s website late Friday afternoon.

Tofino’s district office announced the advisory on May 13, explaining that the town’s chlorination system had failed overnight.

“Water is now being safely treated, however we require a minimum of 48 hours to confirm whether water is safe for consumption,” read the notice. “District of Tofino staff are continually monitoring the water supply system and working with Island Health to gather information.”

Mayor Josie Osborne told the Westerly News that the advisory was caused by an “unprecedented” chain of events. She said the district is transitioning one of its two water treatment plants to a liquid-chlorine system that, she said, will be more reliable and safe than the current chlorine gas system.

“Some elements of the District’s water system were down for maintenance longer than expected and some of the ‘fail-safe mechanisms’ failed, including a low-chlorine alarm,” she said. “The Public Works staff has repaired and re-established the alarms that notify us when chlorine levels are low, which should help avoid this problem in the future.”

She added district staff are reviewing what happened and investigating the reliability of the town’s approach to its water system.

“This might result in some changes to further reduce risks,” she said. “I recognize that a precautionary boil water advisory is not only a concern for some of our town’s more vulnerable residents such as babies, seniors or those with compromised immune systems, but it has also been a massive inconvenience for businesses.”

READ MORE: Tofino pursues $40 million grant for sewage treatment

READ MORE: Ucluelet eyes Kennedy Lake as potential water source for growing community

READ MORE: State of Emergency over for Ahousaht First Nation



andrew.bailey@westerlynews.ca

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Surfrider Pacific Rim: Celebrating SonBird’s dedication to the Coast

West Coast recycling centre continues to serve thanks to an open-air depot and new regulations.

Pacific Rim National Park Reserve issues wolf advisory

Frequent sightings reported around Long Beach area.

Online video series to feature writers from Tofino and Ucluelet

Quite Determined series launched to showcase creative minds whose speaking events were cancelled.

Ucluelet releases COVID-19 Recovery Plan

Part of the recovery plan involves deploying three district staff as COVID-19 Community Monitors

VIDEO: A Vancouver Island black bear takes weekend nap in eagle tree

Videos captured by Terry Eissfeldt shows the bear arriving Saturday night and sleeping in on Sunday

Trudeau avoids questions about anti-racism protesters dispersed for Trump photo-op

Prime minister says racism is an issue Canadians must tackle at home, too

Considerations made to keep Island community’s drive-by birthday celebrations going

Trucks will tone it down or not use horns at all to bring some joy to kids and older folks

Summer tubing ban on Cowichan River lifted

The Tube Shack opening on June 27

NDP getting COVID-19 wage subsidy ‘indirectly,’ B.C. Liberal leader says

B.C. NDP says Andrew Wilkinson is wrong about federal link

Parent, superintendent, trustee report smooth return to classrooms in B.C.

The biggest challenge is convincing families that it’s safe, some say

Vancouver Island grizzlies: moving in, or just passing through?

Lack of data makes seeming increase in grizzly sightings on the North Island an open question

Most Read