A&W Canada first restaurant chain to ban straws

Company says it will eliminate all plastic straws from all restaurants by the end of 2018

A major restaurant chain in Canada has announced it will no longer be providing plastic straws.

The Canadian version of A&W restaurants says it will eliminate all plastic straws by the end of the year, and will be the first quick-service restaurant chain in North America to make this commitment.

“Reducing waste from landfills is a top priority for A&W and this is one big way that we can make a difference,” says Susan Senecal, A&W Canada’s President and Chief Executive Officer.

“We are proud to make this change, which has been driven by the wishes of our guests, franchisees, and staff.”

You’ll still be able to request a paper straw, which is 100 per cent biodegradable and lasts up to three hours in a drink before it breaks down, and will naturally break down within six months in the environment.

The switch to paper straws is expected to keep 82 million plastic straws out of landfills each year, according to the company.

“Eliminating plastic straws is another big step for us. As we learn more about new tools and sustainable practices, we look forward to more improvements ahead,” said Tyler Pronyk, A&W Canada’s Director of Distribution, Equipment & Packaging.

“By using compostable packaging, real mugs, plates and cutlery, we are diverting millions of single-use packaging from landfills every year.”

A&W is Canada’s second largest hamburger chain with more than 900 locations.

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Just Posted

Ucluelet fears orca protection could shut down fisheries

“I beg you to start a process to put a stick in the wheels and slow these people down.”

Ucluelet mayor thanks team at last meeting

Dianne St. Jacques is not running for re-election this month.

VIDEO: This is what buying legal pot in B.C. looks like

Take a look inside B.C.’s first and only legal pot shop located in Kamloops

10 things still illegal in the new age of recreational cannabis

Pot is legal – but there are still a lot of rules, and breaking some could leave you in jail

‘Police are ready’ for legal pot, say Canadian chiefs

But Canadians won’t see major policing changes as pot becomes legal

Mellow opening to B.C.’s only legal pot shop

About five people lined up early for the opening of the BC Cannabis Store in Kamloops.

Money Monitor: Should you switch to a fixed-rate mortgage?

BMO’s Omar Abouzaher outlines the pros and cons of both types of mortgages

Earth still moving in Old Fort, B.C., but not above homes: geologists

Transportation Ministry crews are ready to start work on the Old Fort road

Around the BCHL: Youth trumps experience for Chilliwack and Salmon Arm

Around the BCHL is a look at goings-on in the BCHL and the junior A world.

GoByBike challenge launched in Ucluelet

Participants get a chance to win a cycle tour in Sicily, Italy.

Proportional representation grows government, B.C. study finds

Spending, deficits higher in countries where voting system used

Black market will thrive until small pot growers and sellers included: advocates

Advocates say the black market will continue to thrive until small retail shops and craft growers are included in the regime.

Goodbye cable, hello Netflix: 1/3 of Canadians cut the cord

Just under half of households no longer have a landline phone

‘Some baloney’ in assertion Canada’s pension fund has highest ethical standards

The Canadian Press Baloney Meter is a dispassionate examination of political statements culminating in a ranking of accuracy on a scale of “no baloney” to “full of baloney”.

Most Read