LNG glut dims outlook for new plants

Coleman confident B.C. will be competitive despite low prices, challenges flagged in natural gas forecast

A new forecast of global natural gas demand paints a gloomier picture of the prospects for the launch of a major new LNG industry in B.C.

A new report suggests the odds are getting longer for the B.C. government’s dream of opening several liquefied natural gas export plants.

The International Energy Agency warned a flood of new LNG supply is coming onto the market and new plants will struggle to get off the ground.

“Several projects have already been scrapped or postponed, and the number of casualties will rise if prices do not recover,” said the IEA’s medium-term gas market report.

The IEA cut its LNG growth forecast from 2.3 to 2.0 per cent a year.

It noted the 17 new LNG projects already under construction will come on stream as planned and run flat out in an attempt to recover as much of their sunk costs as possible, further adding to the supply glut.

But new plants that aren’t yet approved will become harder to justify.

“Today LNG prices simply do not cover the capital costs of new plants.”

Natural Gas Development Minister Rich Coleman said he’s aware of the short-term challenges outlined in the report.

The province last month signed a long-term agreement with LNG proponent Pacific Northwest LNG assuring the $36-billion Petronas-led project of royalty and tax stability in B.C.

“Clearly some of the largest companies in the world see the value in building a LNG industry in B.C.,” Coleman said in a statement emailed by his office.

“The fact is, LNG projects have lifespans of 30-50 years. So proponents are looking at the long-term economics when deciding the viability of a project . Many analysts are forecasting that B.C. LNG will be competitive over the long-term. We share that view.”

Just Posted

Lack of security: why Vancouver Island food production is on the decline

Big Read: agriculture a big, expensive commitment as advocates push to make us more food secure

Earth Day 2018 focuses on ending plastic pollution

“Choose one easily changeable plastic item that you can work to eliminate from your day-to-day life.”

Tofino Shorebird Festival ready for flight

Annual event raises awareness of tiny travellers

Snowbirds fly over Tofino and Ucluelet

“We had front row seats.”

REPLAY: B.C. this week in video

In case you missed it, here’s a look at replay-worthy highlights from across the province this week

How to keep local news visible in your Facebook feed

Facebook has changed the news feed to emphasize personal connections. You might see less news.

Dix says B.C. remains focused on fighting youth overdoses in wake of teen’s death

Elliot Eurchuk’s parents say he died at his Oak Bay home after taking street drugs

Final week for ALR input

Public consultation process closes April 30

‘When everybody leaves: Counselling key to help Humboldt move on after bus crash

Dealing with life after a tragedy can be the worst part following a loss

Half-naked shooter guns down four, runs away in Nashville Waffle House shooting

Nashville police say they are looking for Travis Reinking in connection with the shooting

Child’s body found in river downstream from where boy went missing during flood

Three-year-old Kaden Young was swept out of his mother’s arms in February

B.C. VIEWS: Eliminating efficiency for farm workers

Don’t worry, NDP says, the B.C. economy’s booming

B.C. student makes short-list for autism advocacy award

Brody Butts honoured for his role as a mentor and self-advocate

Most Read