B.C. Salmon Farmers publish first-ever sustainability progress report

The report highlights environmental, social, and economic impact of B.C. salmon farming.

  • Wed Nov 18th, 2015 6:00am
  • News

Nora O’Malley

Westerly News

Now chefs can serve delicious West Coast cedar-planked salmon with a healthy side of transparency thanks to an inaugural sustainability progress report released by the B.C. Salmon Farmers Association (BCSFA).

The report, which highlights the environmental, social, and economic impact of B.C. salmon farming, was first revealed to an international audience at the global aquaculture conference held in Vancouver on Oct. 27.

“Our report was referenced by a number of speakers throughout the week as an example of transparency in salmon farming and aquaculture and an example of progressive communications in sharing with people what happens in aquaculture,” said BCSFA executive director Jeremy Dunn.

The 32-page colour document includes photography, quick facts, infographics, and details everything from farming technology and fish health to conservation and First Nations economies.

According to the report, B.C. salmon farmers have engaged in 19 economic and social partnerships with coastal First Nations, and are working on many more.

“First Nations are a big part of the conversation. Our members are looking to work with First Nations who would like to have salmon aquaculture as part of the development in their territory and look to overall have B.C. produce more farm raised salmon,” Dunn told the Westerly News.

“We’re never going to be one of those countries that is producing in the hundreds of thousands of tonnes of fish, but we think we can produce great fish. We can produce high-quality fish and we can set an example in terms of environmental management and pre-competitive co-operation on the environment front and provide long-term stable economy and jobs in rural coastal communities,” he said.

Anyone interested in reading BCSFA’s sustainability progress report is encouraged to visit: bcsalmonfarmers.ca. You’ll find the link under the first section on the home page titled Growing the World’s Best Fish.

nora.omalley@westerlynews.ca