Canada 150 grants pour into local projects

“I hope that these projects will create opportunities to learn, share and act in ways that make us proud of Canada’s future.”

Christmas came early for a handful of local organizations that saw Canada 150 grants slide down their chimneys and into their coffers.

“We are pleased to announce that $35,225 has been awarded to community projects in the Clayoquot Biosphere Region and hope that these projects inspire you to participate in your community and dream big for the future of our region and for Canada,” said the Clayoquot Biosphere Trust’s Executive Director Rebecca Hurwitz.

That $35,225 will be split between eight local projects—The Tofino-Clayoquot Heritage Museum’s Nuu-chah-nulth exhibits, Ucluelet Secondary School’s Quebec Trip, The Carving on the Edge Festival Society’s virtual museum, the District of Ucluelet’s Folklore Festival, Heartwood Learning Community Tofino’s Nuu-chah-nulth and French programs, the Central Westcoast Forest Society’s Invasive Species Initiative, a Ucluelet Elementary School Harbour Cleanup and a community signage project launched by the Ucluelet First Nation.

With Canada getting set to celebrate its 150th birthday in 2017,  Community Foundations Canada has dished out Canada 150 grants to about 190 community organizations in an effort to strengthen Canadians’ sense of place.

“Canada’s 150th is an historic moment with the power to strengthen our communities and our connection to one another. Through the leadership of participating community foundations, the Community Fund for Canada’s 150th will spark initiatives and activities that bring out the best that Canada has to offer,” said Community Foundations Canada president Ian Bird.

“The Fund will encourage all Canadians to contribute to their communities in a way that fosters a greater sense of belonging, inclusion, and Reconciliation as we look to 2017 as a catalyst for community development in the years ahead.”

Hurwitz said the local projects selected would help strengthen the West Coast’s national pride.

“With the anniversary just around the corner, this is an opportunity to reflect on the history of Canada. We each have a different experience of what being Canadian means and it is important to talk about this,” she said.

“I hope that these projects will create opportunities to learn, share and act in ways that make us proud of Canada’s future.”

 

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